Unusual Hotels from Around the World Worth Checking-In To

Inntel Hotels Amsterdam Zaandam

Tired of staying in run-of-the-mill accommodations? Luckily there are a number of unusual Airbnb rentals, hotels, and inns that will add to the fascinating experiences you can have on your trips. From a bookworm’s haven to a room with an underwater view, here are some of the far from usual places to stay when traveling.

Book and Bed Tokyo (Tokyo, Japan)
Book and Bed Tokyo combines the affordable and minimalist small rooms of capsule hotels and the amenities of a bookstore. You can snuggle into your little space behind the shelves and read to your heart’s content.

Inntel Hotels Amsterdam Zaandam (Zaandam, Netherlands)
It is not every day that you get to stay in a hotel built by stacking houses. The Inntel Hotels Amsterdam Zaandam features an eye-catching and a fascinating interior that showcases the colors traditionally used in the region.

The Manta Resort (Pemba Island, Tanzania)
The Manta Resort is an idyllic getaway. Located on a remote island, it boasts of beautiful and unspoiled scenery. The resort’s Underwater Room offers a great view of what lies beneath the pristine waters — a stunning display of marine life.

Palacio de Sal (Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia)
Imagine spending time at a posh hotel made of salt in the middle of the desert. Palacio de Sal is a luxurious place built using salt from the famous salt flats of Salar de Uyuni. Some of its furniture is likewise made with the same material making it a place that truly pays homage to its unique and beautiful surroundings.

5 of the Most Unusual Festivals in the World

Festivals are among the fascinating things to see and experience when traveling. There is no dearth of interesting things to find in gatherings that celebrate art, culture, religious rituals, music, and more. But there are some events that stand out for their rather unusual ways of celebrating customs and traditions. And here are just some of them.

1. Cheung Chau Bun Festival (Cheung Chau, Hong Kong)
Cheung Chau Bun Festival
The Cheung Chau Bun Festival is an annual traditional Chinese festival dates back to the 18th century. It features a lot of attractions including parades and lion dances. The festival’s highlight, however, is its bun scrambling contest where the participants race to climb the bun towers made with bamboo covered with thousands of handmade buns.

2. El Colacho (Castrillo de Murcia, Spain)
El Colacho
Every year, in the village of Castrillo de Murcia in Spain, the celebration of the feast of Corpus Christi features an out-of-the-ordinary festival known as El Colacho or the Baby Jumping Festival. During this event, all babies born in the past year are laid down on mattresses in the middle of the street. The adult male villagers then take their turns jumping over the babies.

3. Fiesta de Santa Marta de Ribarteme (Las Nieves, Spain)
Fiesta de Santa Marta de Ribarteme
The Festival of Near Death Experiences is an annual festival dedicated to the Patron saint of resurrection – Santa Marta de Ribarteme. Here you will find throngs of people carrying coffins where those who had near-death experiences in the previous year lie.

4. Kanamara Matsuri (Kawasaki, Japan)
Kanamara Matsuri
Also known as the Penis Festival, Kanamara Matsuri is an annual festival held during the first Sunday of April. While many considered it as just another quirky event, the festival has historic and religious roots that make it more than just a “weird” event. Some of the highlights of this unusual event include the black phallic mikoshi or palanquin carried around during festivals, a huge pink penis effigy, and the wide-array of penis-themed souvenirs.

5. Nakizumo (Tokyo, Japan)
Nakizumo
Nakizumo or “sumo of tears” is a tradition that dates back to over 400 years. It is often held in temples like the famous Sensoji Temple in Tokyo. Sumo wrestlers carrying babies compete against each other. Don’t worry there is no wrestling involved. Instead, the sumo wrestlers hold babies and face off to see whose baby will cry first. The last one to cry wins.

5 of the Eeriest Places in the World

Spooky places may not be on top of many travelers’ must-visit list. But there are some sites where the creep and fear factor seem to serve as the biggest draws. Here’s a look at some of the eeriest places in the world and why you should visit them…or not.

1. Aokigahara (Fujikawaguchiko, Japan)

Death seems to pervade the infamous Aokigahara Forest. Also known as Suicide Forest, many have chosen to die there. Several bodies of people believed to have committed suicide have been found there with many still possibly left undiscovered. Death by hanging from the forest’s trees is said to be one of the most common methods of taking one’s life within the eerie vastness of Aokigahara.

2. Catacombes de Paris (Paris, France)

The Catacombes de Paris or Catacombs of Paris are a network of underground ossuaries in the City of Light. The place used to be a limestone quarry during the ancient times. Sometime in the 1780s, some of the bones dug out from overflowing cemeteries in the city were transferred to the catacombs. It now home to over six million Parisian’s skeletal remains.

3. Fort Alexander (Saint Petersburg, Russia)

Fort Alexander is an abandoned place somewhere in the Baltic Sea. It once served as a naval fortress. But what made it interesting in a creepy kind of way is that it also became the base for a plague research facility at some point.

4. Akodessewa Fetish Market (Lomé, Togo)

Akodessewa Fetish Market is a different kind of marketplace where you will find some of the most unusual items imaginable. This voodoo market sells a wide array of things – from monkey heads to animal bones among many others. It is essentially a pharmacy or go-to market for voodoo practitioners.

5. Jatinga (Assam, India)

The small village of Jatinga is known for its mysterious bird phenomenon. Every year, between the months of September and November, many birds plunge to their deaths. This strange phenomenon known as the Bird Mystery typically occurs after sunset as soon as the sky turns dark and often during moonless nights.